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Vogue Arabia, the style bible that sought to put the Middle East on the international fashion map, has dismissed and replaced its Saudi princess editor after just two editions. ​

​ The announcement came one day after Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz, the mother of three who previously set up a members-only fashion business introducing edgy designers to the Gulf, told media outlets that she had been sacked. Nervora, the Dubai-based publishers, announced Friday that Manuel Arnaut, who began his career at Vogue Portugal, had been appointed editor-in-chief effective May 7. ​

​ He is the second man appointed to lead an edition of Vogue in less than a week, following the appointment of Ghana-born Briton Edward Enninful to British Vogue. Even in the cut-throat world of glossy magazine publishing, it was an astonishingly quick exit for a woman widely known in fashion circles and feted for putting US supermodel Gigi Hadid in a jewel-encrusted veil on the inaugural cover. ​

​ "I refused to compromise when I felt the publisher's approach conflicted with the values which underpin our readers and the role of the editor-in-chief in meeting those values in a truly authentic way," Abdulaziz told Business of Fashion. "I am proud of what I have been able to accomplish in such a short space of time," the London-based website quoted her as saying. ​

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​ Arnaut has worked for Conde Nast for more than a decade and oversaw the 2015 launch of Architectural Digest Middle East. "The team and I are committed to working towards a Vogue Arabia that is the proud voice of the region, representing the strength and allure of the Arab woman," he said in a statement. ​

​ Nervora CEO Shashi Menon paid brief tribute to Abdulaziz, who was appointed in July 2016. "As the launch editor-in-chief of Vogue Arabia, Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz has earned a place in the history of fashion and Vogue," Menon said. Vogue Arabia launched an Arabic and English-language website last year and its print edition in March. It is published by Nervora under license agreement with Conde Nast International.​ (AFP)