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H&M recalls children's pajamas for burn injury risk

Business

H&M recalls children's pajamas for burn injury risk

By DPA

26 Jul 2019

H&M Hennes & Mauritz issued a recall for children's pajamas as they could pose burn injury risk.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Sweden-based fashion retailer is recalling about 9,000 units of children's pajama sets for not meeting the federal flammability standard for children's sleepwear.

However, no incidents or injuries related to these pajama sets have been reported so far.

The pajamas were made in Bangladesh and imported by H&M Hennes & Mauritz. The products were sold at H&M stores nationwide and online from July 2018 to May 2019.

This recall involves two styles of children's cotton knit, long-sleeve top and pant pajama sets that were sold in sizes 2 through 10, for between 14.99 and 24.99 dollars.

The first style was sold as a set of two pajamas, with pink and gray long-sleeve tops. The pink top has a dog's face screen-printed onto the front, with two extended 3D fabricated ears.

The gray top has a pink bow trim located at the neckline and a pink heart that is screen-printed on the left chest. The tops are paired with pink and polka dot print long pants. The company is recalling both the pink and grey tops.

The second style was sold only as a single set. The recalled long-sleeve top of the single set is white in color, with a cat's face screen-printed on the front and two extended 3D fabricated ears.

This top is paired with long white polka dot pants. Only the top is included in this recall.

"Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled pajama tops and contact H&M for a full refund, plus a 20 dollar gift card," the CPSC said.

In April, H&M had issued another recall for about 980 units of children's hooded bathrobes in the U.S., citing a risk of burn injuries to children.

The products were manufactured in China and were sold for between 25 and 30 dollars between October 2018 and March 2019.(DPA)